Saturday, October 28, 2006

ONE VOTE DOES COUNT IN THE SENATE

SAMPLE OF VOTES WHERE DEWINE WAS KEY VOTE SUPPORTING FAILED BUSH POLICIES OVER THE MIDDLE CLASS

DeWine Said He Saw Evidence of WMD, Then Was Deciding Vote Preventing Investigation of Flawed Intelligence


DeWine Claimed He Saw Classified Information That Proved Iraq Had WMD.
The Toledo Blade reported in July 2002 that, “[DeWine] repeated his insistence that Saddam Hussein has chemical and biological weapons and is trying to get nuclear weapons. He refused to be specific, saying, ‘A lot of this stuff is classified.’” [Toledo Blade, 7/10/02]

DeWine Admitted He Doesn’t Read the Intel Reports.
“A consensus of 16 intelligence agencies,” the report “says the Iraq war is breeding potential new terrorists”. Despite being a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, DeWine did not read the report until this week even though he had access to it in April. DeWine dismisses the central finding of the document as a “claim” that “has been made in the past.” He only read it “when it became a flash point this week.” [Plain Dealer, 9/28/06]

DeWine Was Key Vote AGAINST Child Tax Credits, College Tax Credits, Other Family Assistance


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against A Substitute to Bush Tax Bill; Included $765 Wage Credit, State Aid, Increased Child Tax Credit, Business Stimulus, Breaks For Employers of National Guardspersons.
DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against a substitute amendment by Landrieu to the 2003 Bush tax cut that would create a wage credit of up to $765 per worker or $1,530 per working couple while giving an equivalent tax credit to employers.

It would provide $52 billion in fiscal relief to states, accelerate reductions in the so-called marriage penalty, increase the child tax credit to $1,000 by 2006, allow businesses to write off $100,000 in investment for one year, create a 50 percent tax credit for small business health care expenses, create wage credits for employers in Renewal Communities, create a 50 percent tax credit for companies with employees in the National Guard and Reserves and extend unemployment benefits by 13 weeks.

It would be offset by restrictions on corporate use of off-shore tax shelters and an increase in customs user fees. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #162; The Advocate, 5/16/03]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Reducing Tax Cut on Top Tax Bracket And Increasing and Making Permanent Tax Deduction for College Tuition.
DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would have increased the amount families could deduct on their taxes for college tuition would have made that deduction permanent.

The tax deductibility was to expire in 2006 at $4,000. This amendment raised the amount to $8,000 for 2004, with the deduction eventually reaching $12,000. It also made the deduction permanent. The amendment would have reduced the reduced the top income rate by only 1 percent, as opposed to 3 percent proposed by President Bush. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #164; Congressional Record, 5/15/03]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Opposed $2.2 Billion for Higher Education, Including $1.7 Billion for Pell Grants.
DeWine, on September 9, 2003, cast one of the deciding votes against the Kennedy amendment to H.R.2660, which was an amendment to provide an additional $2.2 billion for higher education, including $1.7 billion for Pell Grants, $157 million for federal work study programs, and $115 million for supplemental education opportunity grants. [HR 2660, 9/9/03, #331]

DeWine Disagreed with the National Education Association.
“NEA supported a motion offered by Senator Kennedy (D-MA) to waive procedural budget rules and allow passage of his amendment to the Fiscal Year 2004 Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations bill (H.R. 2660). The Kennedy amendment would have increased funding for higher education programs by $2.2 billion. Specifically, the Kennedy amendment would have raised the maximum Pell Grant award from $4,505 to $4,500, increased SEOG funding from $700 million to $875 million, increased College Work Study funding from $1 billion to $1.16 billion, and increased TRIO funding from $840 million to $1 billion. The Kennedy motion, which required 60 votes for passage, failed 49-46 on September 9, 2003. A ‘yes’ vote supported the NEA position.” [HR 2660, 9/9/03, #331; www.NEA.org]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Giving a Child Tax Credit to All Families Regardless of Income.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment to require that all recipients of a $400 child tax credit in Bush’s “Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003” receive the full payment regardless of their income. The amendment also accelerated Bush’s dividend tax cuts by one year. These provisions would be offset by eliminating the bill’s 10 percent increase in dividend income excluded from taxation from 2008 through 2012. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #151]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Increasing the Child Tax Credit to $1,000 Retroactively Back to 2002, and Delaying Reduction in Tax Cut For Top Incomes.
DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would have made the increases to the child tax credit in the 2003 Bush tax cut bill retroactive to Jan. 1, 2002. The bill already increased the child tax credit from $600 to $1,000 effective back at the beginning of 2003. The costs would have been offset by a delay of a year and a half in the reduction of the top income tax rate. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #166; Congressional Record, 5/15/03]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Accelerating Marriage Tax Cut For Lower Income Families, Offset By Reductions in Top Income Tax Rate.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would have accelerated relief of the so-called marriage penalty for married couples receiving the Earned Income Tax Credit. It would be offset by paring back the reduction in the top income tax rate. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #155]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Creating A $5,000 Tax Credit For Family Caregivers.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against creating a $5,000 tax credit per year for family caregivers. [S 1054, 5/15/03, #169]

DeWine Cast Deciding Votes Against First Responder Funding and Counterterrorism


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against $2.7 Billion in Additional Funding For Counterterrorism.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would increase spending for counterterrorism by $2.7 billion, including increases of $200 million for the Coast Guard, $366 million for the Customs Service and border protection, $1 billion for the Transportation Security Administration, $225 million for the FBI, and increased spending on the FBI and other agencies. [S 762, 4/3/03, #119]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against Firefighter Assistance Grants.
In September 2004, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would increase funding for firefighter assistance grants by $150 million. [HR 4567, 9/14/04, #175]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against Increasing Funding For Fire Fighters And First Responders By $3 Billion.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against increasing spending for fire fighters and other first responders, and offset the spending by reducing tax cuts. The vote was on an amendment that would increase spending for fire departments and other first responders by $3 billion and provide another $3 billion for deficit reduction. [S Con Res 23, 3/25/03, #88]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Opposed Increased Funding for Fire Department Personnel by $17.5 Billion.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment to increase funding for fire department personnel and equipment by $17.5 billion over 10 years, with the funding offset by a reduction in tax cuts in the resolution. [S Con Res 23, 3/25/03, #91]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against $2.33 Billion For First Responders In States And Localities.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would appropriate $2.33 billion for first responders in states and localities. [S 762, 4/3/03, #123]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Opposed Increasing Funding by $93.2 Million to Train Bio-Terrorism Workers.
In 2003, DeWine, cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment to increase funding by $93.2 million to train members of the bio-terrorism workforce, including funding “to double the number of outbreak specialists in the Epidemic Intelligence Service,” in accordance with the recommendation of the Center for Disease Control’s National Advisory Committee on Children and Terrorism. “These EIS specialists are dispatched to respond to epidemics and bio-terrorism.” [HR 2660, 9/5/03, #328; Hillary Clinton, Floor Statement, 9/5/03]

DeWine Cast Deciding Vote Against Increasing Defense Spending

DeWine Cast Deciding Vote Against Rolling Back Tax Cuts And Increasing Defense Spending.
In 2005, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would adjust the functional totals to deny $100 billion of the tax relief that the Domenici amendment would provide (the amendment, as introduced, would have returned $1.6 trillion of the $5.6 trillion in excess taxes that the Federal Government is conservatively expected to collect over the next 10 years) and to increase defense spending by the same amount (about $10 billion more would be provided for each year). The amendment was rejected, 47-52. [H Con Res 83, 4/4/01, #71]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote Against Increasing Spending On Military Health Care By $21 Billion And Reduce Tax Cuts.
On March 25, 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against increasing spending on military health care, and offset the spending by reducing tax cuts. The vote was on the Lincoln, D-Ark., amendment that would increase spending on the TRICARE program by $21 billion over 10 years to give members of the National Guard and Reserves and their families greater access to the health care program. The increase would be offset by a reduction in tax cuts. More than 20 percent of those in the National Guard and Reserves do not have health insurance. [S Con Res 23, 3/25/03, #81; Blanche Lincoln, Floor Statement, 3/25/03]

DeWine Cast Deciding Votes Protecting Halliburton, Other Donors’ No-Bid Contracts In Iraq


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote for No-Bid Contracts.
In June 2002, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would allow private and public agencies to compete for new Defense Department contracts based on current department standards. It also would codify a contracting prohibition on work currently performed in the public sector unless the agency can show a savings of at least 10 percent. [S 2514, 6/25/02, #162]

DeWine Cast Deciding Votes Against Education


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against $6 Billion in Education Funding.
DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against $6 billion for provisions of the 2001 education overhaul law. The vote was on the Kennedy, D-Mass. amendment to the Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations bill. [HJ Res 2, 1/16/03, #5]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against Increasing Education Funding.
On March 19, 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against reducing President Bush’s tax cut by $18 billion and splitting it evenly between education and deficit reduction. The amendment, which was sponsored by Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA), would have fully funded the “No Child Left Behind Act” and reduced tax cuts for the wealthiest taxpayers. The vote was on a motion to table the amendment, which was killed by a vote of 50-48. The NAACP supported the Murray amendment. [S Con Res 23, 3/19/03, #60; Associated Press, 3/19/03; NAACP Legislative Report Card, 2003-04]

NEA: DeWine Opposed Full Funding of Education Programs at the Level Authorized in No Child Left Behind.
NEA opposed a motion offered by Senator Gregg (R-NH) to “table” (reject) an amendment by Senator Murray (D-WA) to the Fiscal Year 2004 Budget Resolution (S. Con Res. 23). The Murray amendment would have provided an additional $8 billion to allow for full funding of Elementary and Secondary Education Act programs at the $32 billion level authorized in No Child Left Behind. The Gregg motion passed 50-48 on March 19, 2003. A “no” vote supported the NEA position. [S Con Res 23, 3/19/03, #60; www.NEA.org]

DeWine Cast Deciding Votes Against Increased Health Insurance Coverage


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Opposed An Amendment That Would Expand Health Insurance Spending.
In 2000, DeWine voted against an amendment that would scale down tax cuts in the budget resolution, and use the difference to increase spending for the Children’s Health Insurance Program to cover adults as well as children. The motion to table failed, 49-49. [SCR 101, 4/7/00, #77; Senate RPC, 4/7/00]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against An Amendment To Deny Tax Cuts And Expand Health Insurance Coverage.
In 2000, DeWine voted against an amendment that would adjust the functional totals to deny $11.2 billion over 5 years of the $150 billion in tax cuts that would be provided by the resolution. It would also adjust the functional totals in order to increase total Federal spending by that amount, with the intention that the extra spending would be used to expand the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) to cover adults as well as children. The amendment was rejected, 49-49. [SCR 101, 4/7/00, #78; S. Amdt. 2962, Senate RPC, 4/7/00]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against Reducing Insurance Premiums.
In May 2001, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against an amendment that would provide a deduction for eligible long-term care insurance premiums that would be offset by eliminating the first reduction scheduled in the 39.6 percent tax rate. [HR 1836, 5/23/01, #162]

DeWine Cast Key Vote Against REAL Prescription Drug Plan


DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Opposed A Democratic Medicare Prescription Drug Plan Alternative.
In 2002, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against the Graham amendment to S.812, which was the Democratic Medicare prescription drug plan. This plan, which is estimated to cost $594 billion over eight years, is a plan to provide uniform, universal prescription drug coverage to all senior citizens through Medicare, not private insurers. Under this proposal, “a Medicare beneficiary would pay premiums of $25 a month and co-payments of $10 for each generic drug and $40 for each brand name drug on a list of approved medicines. There would be no deductible. The beneficiary’s out-of-pocket costs would be limited to $4,000 a year.” [S 812, 7/23/02, #186; New York Times, 7/24/02]

AFL-CIO Supported Democratic Medicare Prescription Drug Plan.
“Skyrocketing costs for prescription drugs have forced millions of seniors to choose whether to buy needed medicine, pay their rent or mortgage or buy groceries. Others have been forced to travel to Canada where the same drugs are much less expensive or to cut their prescribed doses in an effort to stretch their medicines. During debate on drug patent legislation (S. 812), Sen. Robert Graham (D-Fla.) offered an amendment to establish a new voluntary prescription drug benefit for Medicare beneficiaries (S. 2625). For a monthly premium of $25, beneficiaries could purchase generic drugs for $10 and brand name drugs for $40. Out-of-pocket expenses would be capped at $4,000, at which point Medicare would pay 100 percent of drug costs. The benefit would be provided through Medicare. The amendment also called for financial relief to employers that continue their retiree coverage for Medicare beneficiaries.” [www.afl-cio.org]

DeWine Cast Crucial Vote; Voted Against A Prescription Drug Benefit For All Medicare Beneficiaries.
In 2003, DeWine cast one of the deciding votes against requiring that any Medicare prescription drug benefit to be available to all beneficiaries on an equal basis, including those who choose to remain in the fee-for-service program. [S Con Res 23, 3/25/03, #82]

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